Jeremy C. Bates

jbates@mselaw.com | vCard

Jeremy Bates acts as a lawyers’ lawyer. He has defended many lawyers and law firms in professional-responsibility matters:

  • Jeremy secured the dismissal of malpractice claims against a national law firm in a decision that was a New York Law Journal “Decision of Note” because it clarified lawyers’ duties in M&A transactions;
  • Jeremy helped win a trial-level dismissal of defamation claims against an AmLaw 100 partner that arose out of a failed real-estate closing;
  • Jeremy was hailed as a Law360 “Legal Lion” for helping convince the Commercial Division, New York County, to dismiss all five claims in a $10 million action against a prominent commercial firm;
  • Jeremy has successfully defended clients against Judiciary Law § 487 claims, most recently arguing before the Appellate Division, First Department, that a $36 million claim was properly dismissed;
  • Jeremy also helped another law-firm client secure a dismissal that is now the leading case for the rule that Judiciary Law § 487 does not apply to administrative proceedings;
  • Jeremy assisted in defeating RICO claims against a law firm;
  • Jeremy acted as special ethics counsel in a case in which an opposing lawyer broke nearly every New York rule governing deposition conduct;
  • Jeremy successfully represented a lawyer in a disciplinary proceeding; and
  • Jeremy has represented lawyers and firms in alternative resolutions and pre-litigation dispositions of various disputes.

Jeremy currently serves as a member of the Committee on Professional Ethics of the New York City Bar Association. He frequently lectures on professional-responsibility issues.

Aside from representing lawyers and law firms, at MSE Jeremy represents plaintiffs and defendants in a wide array of litigation matters. In a federal case that was another NYLJ “Decision of Note,” the court denied dismissal of his client’s electronic-discovery counterclaims. Jeremy has also secured the dismissal of federal RICO, trademark, and computer-fraud claims.  Jeremy helped secure the dismissal of fiduciary-duty claims against a medical practice and its individual doctors. He also second-chaired a FINRA arbitration that resulted in a complete vindication for MSE’s clients.

Jeremy was lead counsel in a pro bono case that successfully challenged a federal drug-reimbursement regulation, and produced substantial recovery for two Medicare beneficiaries. He also argued a habeas appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Jeremy joined MSE in 2009 after spending six years at the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell. There he represented major financial institutions. He drafted winning briefs to appellate courts, earned trial-level dismissals of complaints in several states against a private equity fund, and shepherded financial institutions thorough investigations by the SEC, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the New York Attorney General’s Office.

Jeremy has a special interest in voting rights. As a voter, he successfully sued the District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics for miscounting votes in a city election. In 2008 he volunteered as a voter-protection attorney for the Obama campaign in North Dakota and Michigan. Jeremy also brought an action against his church for denying its members’ right to vote against board nominees and for failing to give its members its financial statements. The church’s resulting financial disclosure was reported on the front page of The New York Times.

Jeremy graduated cum laude from Harvard College and with honors from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was Editor in Chief of the University of Chicago Legal Forum and edited a volume on antitrust law. Before law school, Jeremy served for five years as a legislative assistant to U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan. After law school, Jeremy clerked for U.S. Circuit Judge Jacques L. Weiner, Jr., of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Jeremy’s speaking engagements in 2017:

  • “Answers to Everyday Ethical Questions,” CLE panel at the New York City Bar Association (Feb. 7, 2017).
  • “Litigating Attorney-Misconduct Claims Under New York’s Judiciary Law § 487,” Lawline presentation (Nov. 7, 2017).